BLACK HEART FOR AMERICA
       
     
SILVER HEART
       
     
BLACK HEART FOR AMERICA
       
     
BLACK HEART FOR AMERICA
       
     
BLACK HEART FOR AMERICA

2011, Glass beads on clay, chain, 60” x 6”

Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, Vermont

 

Since the inception of this country Latinos have fought in every major war from outside and from within. Hispanics have received more Medals of Honor than any other identifiable ethnic group and have consistently received awards for heroism out of proportion to the actual population of Hispanics. These sculpture represents the token that many families receive in the form of a medal in exchange for the life of their loved one.

 

SILVER HEART
       
     
SILVER HEART

2012, Glass beads on clay, chain, 60” x 6”

Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, Vermont

Latinos or Hispanic Americans have always conducted themselves well in the U.S. military – from its earliest beginnings in 1863 to the present-day conflicts. Latinos constitute the ethnic group that has received the most U.S. Medals of Honor, which is the nation’s highest award for valor on the fields of battle.


Sixty men of Latino or Hispanic heritage have been awarded the Medal of Honor. Of the sixty Medals of Honor presented to Latinos, two were presented to members of the United States Navy, thirteen to members of the United States Marine Corps and forty-six to members of the United States Army. Forty-two Medals of Honor were presented posthumously.


Latino Spanish-speaking and Spanish-surnamed military men that portray a shared cultural heritage that placed a high value on military service and on battlefield courage. The first "Latinos" to fight for American war aims were not ethnic minorities within the U.S., but colonial subjects of Spain.

BLACK HEART FOR AMERICA
       
     
BLACK HEART FOR AMERICA

2011, glass beads on clay sculpture, chain, 6"D x 60"L