Second Sight
       
     
FLORA AND FAUNA
       
     
Aftermath
       
     
LA CRIOLLA
       
     
LA DORADA
       
     
LA PLATEADA
       
     
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LA MINERA
       
     
La Mano Poderosa
       
     
Empire
       
     
Cumbia
       
     
Black Gold
       
     
ARRESTED SYMPHONY
       
     
COLONIAL BLUES
       
     
Sonata Oscura
       
     
OBSIDIAN
       
     
OBSIDIAN
       
     
EMERALD TEARS
       
     
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Second Sight
       
     
Second Sight

Second Sight, 2008 - 2018, Installation, table, mirror, 20 glass and metal beaded sculptures on clay, 44” h x 54” l x 20” d

Second Sight honors the Curandera (healer) in Latinx culture as a whole, as well as the personal connection to my grandmothers who were both curanderas in Colombia. These individuals dedicated their lives to maintaining the physical and spiritual well being and equilibrium of their families and communities. Each individual piece represents the instruments and fruits of their Labors.


FLORA AND FAUNA
       
     
FLORA AND FAUNA

2018, clay, chains

Aftermath
       
     
Aftermath

Clay, chains, 70”L x 24” W x 8” D

LA CRIOLLA
       
     
LA CRIOLLA

2O19, Clay, chains, amulets, 24” h x 8” w x 5'‘d

LA DORADA
       
     
LA DORADA

Clay sculpture, gold metal beads, 60”L x 18” W x 12” D

La Dorada brings to light the dilemma of the artisanal gold miners in Colombia, many who are women that say that they have been mining since they were in their mothers bellies. These miners are in jeopardy of losing the mining rights of land where their families have lived and mined for over 400 year.

LA PLATEADA
       
     
LA PLATEADA

Clay, chains, 40” L x 8” W x 4” D

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LA MINERA
       
     
LA MINERA

Many Afro-Colombian gold miners in Colombia are women who have been mining since they were in their mother’s wombs. The land that they have mined for hundreds of years is being stolen by the Colombian government.

Created during residency at 2016 Sculpture Space in Utica, New York.

2016, clay, chain, 40"L x 8"W x 4"D

La Mano Poderosa
       
     
La Mano Poderosa

2016 - 2019

Clay, chains, filigree beads, 30”h x 20”w x 10” d

This piece was begun during my 2016 residency at the Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans.

Empire
       
     
Empire

Chandelier, gold leaf, 1000 feet of gold plated jewelry chain, brass beads, glass beads, 18' L x 6' dia.

This work was created during my 2016 residency at Sculpture Space in Utica, New York.

Cumbia
       
     
Cumbia

2014, clay sculpture, emerald shell chips, wood.
20” L x 24” H x 20” W

“Cumbia” takes its name from the Afro-Latin dance and music which originated in Colombia's Caribbean coastal region around 1648 and was originally danced in shackles. “Cumbia” highlights the exploitation and the utilization of human capital within the gem and mineral industries. In Colombia, as in many other countries, while the emerald industry and it’s international demand is at an all time high, it is also at the center of funding the ongoing civil conflict. The clay sculpture represents a Zambo woman (African and Indigenous) of this era. In warfare, among the first assets to be plundered are women. Separated from its body the head serves as a symbol for the spiritual and intellectual strength that these women and their culture possessed and the colonizers had no claim to. Emerald shell chips embedded above the left eye are a reminder of the history of cultivation that predates the arrival of the Spaniards. The sculpture lays upon a wooden bench found in an abandoned factory in New York City, a relic from a bygone era.

Black Gold
       
     
Black Gold

2014, clay sculpture, metal ball chain, wood. 6’L x 2’H x 1’ d

The black heart mourns the Indigenous and African populations massacred for the retrieval of wealth while gold chains cascade down and away from it.  These objects serve as a metaphor for the cruel system of oppression and violence that is carried out by mineral industries, whether they are mining gold in Brazil, blood diamonds in Sierra Leone, or emeralds in Colombia. The chains form a sort of bridal train that bears in mind the unions forced upon Indigenous peoples that lay the groundwork for much of the gendered, sexual, and racial politics found throughout Colombia today.

ARRESTED SYMPHONY
       
     
ARRESTED SYMPHONY

Clay, chains, semi precious stones, encaustic and oil on panel,
6’ L x 3’ W

COLONIAL BLUES
       
     
COLONIAL BLUES

2015, Installation, oil and encaustic on wood panels, metal chains on clay sculpture, brass chains, brass candle holders, wood, candles, 11' h x 15' w x 6' d

The theme of injustice extends as an important continuum in my work. I exposes commodity industries that are dependent upon abusive practices commencing during the colonization of the Americas.

Sonata Oscura
       
     
Sonata Oscura

2014, oil and encaustic on wood and canvas, axe, brass chain, 11’L x 4’H x 2’W.

OBSIDIAN
       
     
OBSIDIAN

Detail, 2014, oil and encaustic on wood panels and linen, silver chains on clay, 11' L x 7' H x 6" D

OBSIDIAN
       
     
OBSIDIAN

2014, oil and encaustic on wood panels and linen, silver chains on clay, 11' L x 7' H x 6" D

My recent work is a series of installations, sculptures and paintings which explore the theme of injustice as it extends as an important continuum of the roots of the predatory gem and mineral excavation industry, which has it's origins during Colonization. The installations express the worker’s vulnerable position in a brutal world as a disposable commodity in a system of illusory values. The artwork seeks to heightened an understanding of the shared social, political, environmental, and cultural challenges we face in our global reality.

EMERALD TEARS
       
     
EMERALD TEARS

2010 - 2014. Crystal, glass beads on clay, metal base, plinth. 
84” L x 48 W x 60” H

At the core of my sculptures, installations and interventions is the historical and cultural mosaic of the Americas and the Caribbean that has fostered an amazing variety of folk art traditions, rituals, and their continuous and evolving changes. I use a wide variety of materials and sculptural methods often in combination with reworked found objects.  These works are impregnated with cultural symbols that act as sites of memory, both individual and collective, and implements the human body as a symbol and expression of nature, vulnerability and power.  The art examines the extent to which consciousness defines itself through the opposing force of the transcultural experience. 

 

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